Post Reply 
 
Thread Rating:
  • 0 Votes - 0 Average
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Unconventional Power Sources
04-09-2014, 12:54 PM
Post: #1
Unconventional Power Sources
Tiny Microbial Fuel Cell Runs On Spit

Researchers have made a fingernail-sized microbial fuel cell that runs on saliva. The cell generates 1 microwatt of power, enough to power lab-on-a-chip diagnostic devices in rural settings or battlefields, the researchers say.

http://spectrum.ieee.org/tech-talk/green...ign=040914

Is it considered a conspiracy if they really are after you?Huh
Find all posts by this user
Quote this message in a reply
05-21-2014, 01:06 PM
Post: #2
RE: Unconventional Power Sources
There are a number of efforts to build small modular nuclear reactors aimed at lowering the cost of nuclear power. But one company is designing a reactor that’s so small it would fit in a shipping container.

Boston-based UPower Technologies, founded by three nuclear engineers from MIT, is betting that its very small nuclear “battery” can be cost-competitive with power from diesel generators used in remote locations. It’s one of a handful of companies creating new reactor designs with the hopes of improving nuclear power’s safety and cost.


UPower's Truck-Size Nuclear Power Plant

http://spectrum.ieee.org/energywise/ener...ign=052114

Is it considered a conspiracy if they really are after you?Huh
Find all posts by this user
Quote this message in a reply
06-08-2014, 07:11 AM
Post: #3
RE: Unconventional Power Sources
Some inteeresting ideas about the future of our power needs and systems;

What will the grid look like in 2030 and beyond? Chief among the changes we anticipate is decentralization of electric power generation so that businesses, factories, campuses, and households provide their own electricity for much of the day and most of the year.

http://newsmanager.commpartners.com/ieee...email.html

Is it considered a conspiracy if they really are after you?Huh
Find all posts by this user
Quote this message in a reply
02-27-2016, 04:02 PM
Post: #4
RE: Unconventional Power Sources
I have been looking at ways to generate electricity at my remotely located sugar house. I want lights, an exhaust fan and maybe a small sap pump to run off the excess heat generated by the evaporator. I have been looking into thermal electric generators for a little while and it seems like this industry is starting to come up with a lot of small scale options. Each time I check there is something new. There is a big need for remote camps and emergency power supply that can run off your wood stove. Take at look at some of the offerings at this company. They will have a 100 watt option soon.
http://www.tegpower.com/products.html
Find all posts by this user
Quote this message in a reply
02-27-2016, 09:04 PM
Post: #5
RE: Unconventional Power Sources
One of my sons has been following the development of this Teg Power. He liked the info that you sent in the link, he did not know they had gotten this much current out of them yet.

He, and I, are interested in steam. A steam driven generator could run this place easily. Coal is way cheap now and we have plenty of wood. In a SHTF scenario that could be quite a thing. Plus you have power for other machinery too.

There are all kinds of plans to build both boilers and engines. One can buy the casting kits and machine them himself. My son has a small machine shop and does mostly gun repair and manufacture of custom rifles. He can machine most anything.

He has an antique shingle saw machine that we got down in Alfred last fall. It appears to have been manufactured by the Smith co. in Sunappee, NH before the civil war. It is all wood framed and he is restoring it at the moment with the intention of using it for it's original purpose.

He is a pretty clever guy and interested in all kinds of oddball stuff. Good for him.

WC
Find all posts by this user
Quote this message in a reply
11-28-2016, 09:25 AM
Post: #6
RE: Unconventional Power Sources
I rode to town and back in Belgrade, Maine in Chester Twing's Stanley Steamer. Chet knew the Stanley brothers. Yeah, I'm that old.
Find all posts by this user
Quote this message in a reply
11-28-2016, 01:45 PM
Post: #7
RE: Unconventional Power Sources
WC
Have him check with some of the operators of those shingle mills.
You can confirm their length of employment at one by the number of fingers they have left.

Is it considered a conspiracy if they really are after you?Huh
Find all posts by this user
Quote this message in a reply
11-28-2016, 08:24 PM
Post: #8
RE: Unconventional Power Sources
You are right about the dangers of these machines. I have stood beside them watching them saw and wondered what OSHA would say about all of this.

Some of them that I have seen recently have had some 2x wood place vertically, just outside the blade, and ahead of it so that the operator when placing a block in the holding fixture wouldn't fall into the blade if he lost his balance a bit.

I used to get them from a guy in Corinth who was very well known for high quality shingles. His were the best no doubt about it. I have put on hundreds of squares of his product over the time he was making them. He is no longer with us....but died in bed so I guess that wasn't too bad!

His hands were smashed all to pieces and look like someone had broke the fingers over their knee, the same way we break firewood for a campfire, and then had glued them on with Elmer's however they seem to fit. But he told me that had all happened in the "edger"!

There are a couple of different kinds of "edgers". A common one is a flipper table that is spring loaded and you put the shingle on it, hold it with your hand while pushing down to let the blade cut the edge, then flip it over and do the other side. When hurrying this can be deadly to hands and fingers....and often is.

My boy's machine has the big cast iron wheel that has either 4 or 6 hand plane knives on it and it rotates a bit slower than the main saw. It runs inside a cast iron housing with a slot in the side. Take a shingle and put it in that slot and the edge is cut just as smooth as glass! Much safer!

I love sawing and have all my life. Something quite pleasant and rewarding to watch that log slide by that big blade and a nice 2x4 falls off. Never had much money to buy lumber when I was younger but always had access to pine and spruce logs, so had to do it like the pioneers. Even had a horse to twitch with after a while. Never had a skidder or even a tractor in those days. Sawed a lot of stuff and built quite a bit of stuff.

That work goes lots nicer when you are younger.

This was about 35 years ago but a local friend of mine set up a nice Lane rotary mill, right outdoors and built the building around it eventually as he obtained lumber from here and there. He powered it with a 283 Chevy engine running on gasoline of course!

He had a contract with a local lumber guy to cut his logs and saw them, all he wanted. He worked about a 10 hr day and burned 85 gals of gas a day. Didn't take him too long to be convinced that a diesel was the way to go.

Love any kind of wood sawing machinery. Love the sounds, love the smell and the idea of making usable stuff from scratch.

WC
Find all posts by this user
Quote this message in a reply
11-28-2016, 10:12 PM
Post: #9
RE: Unconventional Power Sources
If you want to see how one of these mills works here is a nice video of the machinery in operation at C&K Shingle down in Liberty, ME. Notice the edger, the large planer wheel enclosed in a housing.....much safer. That big blade, right in your face would take some getting used to though.

C&K shingle mill in operation. It is a "hybrid" machine using a Lane frame and Chase carriage and is quite modern as these things go

Company website:

Prices are quite reasonable compared to around the rest of Maine

Chase and Lane machines are relatively "modern" if you can call 1900 as "modern". They have an all cast iron frame and are pretty well automated. My son's machine is a different animal altogether. It has a wooden frame and only the critical parts are cast iron, the rest is wood.

This is a wood framed machine, dating back to around 1860, in Harrison, ME, and is quite similar to ours

It actually is not all that slow, and it is automated re the carriage cycling and the automatic indexing to move the block into position for the next cut. I discovered one in Peterbough, NH that is virtually the exact twin of ours. It was built, in 1855 by a local company that made automatic looms for textile mills. There is only a slight difference between the two and all the cast iron pieces were cast from the same patterns as ours. By 1860, believe it or not, there were tons of automated wood making machinery available to industry, and most of it was made in New England!

WC
Find all posts by this user
Quote this message in a reply
11-28-2016, 10:20 PM
Post: #10
RE: Unconventional Power Sources
I watched three shingle machines in Ashland where the shingle was sawn with one hand while it was butted with the other.
Those guys had a full set of fingers.
Between them.

Is it considered a conspiracy if they really are after you?Huh
Find all posts by this user
Quote this message in a reply
Post Reply 


Forum Jump:


User(s) browsing this thread: 1 Guest(s)

Contact Us | My Site | Return to Top | Return to Content | Lite (Archive) Mode | RSS Syndication