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Greenhouses cost of transplants
04-17-2018, 06:42 PM
Post: #1
Greenhouses cost of transplants
The numerous greenhouses that sell 6 pacs must have a hard time making a profit.

I've been doing my own tomatoes, pepper, vine, cole crops for some time now. Bought a small 10 by 8 whatever mail order green house 4 5 years ago and other than the convenience of getting to start what I want to grow, it cannot be considered a big money maker.

It is a great way to get a jump on the season especially with our cold wet springs and if I had to pay 3 bucks plus a sixpack for everything I start there, it definitely is a plus. That I'd say is the biggest plus getting early spinach and cold crop sets that can stand no heat and make it through these cold nites a week or two still ahead.

I feel for the local greenhouse growers though, you get these cold wet springs and they have got to heat, which I do not. Then you have the lowes walmarts all that crap that comes up south, lot's of competition.

My best to these people, may they long reign as I go out for those plants that failed at my endeavor. But you can't put all your eggs in someone else's basket for that might not be there.
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04-17-2018, 08:58 PM
Post: #2
RE: Greenhouses cost of transplants
Must be some money in it as there are a ton of small operators in my area doing it. One guy lost his barn and greenhouse in a fire early in the winter. They are over there building like crazy on another one as we speak. Must be some incentive.

These folks, down in Brooksville have turned year round gardening into a business. They, like the Nearings they learned a lot from, are pretty liberal but they have all come up with some ideas that work really good.

......“When we started, everyone said it was impossible,” says Eliot Coleman, laughing. “Well, it wasn’t.” Coleman, who has written extensively on organic gardening, pioneered ingenious ways to grow cold-hardy vegetables in the frigid Maine winter by using plastic-covered high tunnel greenhouses heated only by the sun. His approach in a nutshell: grow only cold-hardy crops, plant them in succession in late summer through early fall, and protect them with an inner layer of floating row cover. In 1995, Coleman and his wife—fellow gardening guru Barbara Damrosch—began using these techniques to grow winter crops commercially at Four Season Farm on Cape Rosier, based on years of research and experimentation in their home greenhouse. They’ve been at it ever since, and Coleman has shared his secrets in meticulous detail in his books, including The Winter Harvest Handbook—inspiring farmers around the country and sowing the seeds of a revolution"......

I have read one of Mr Coleman's books and he has put a lot of thinking and experimenting into what he has developed

WC
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04-18-2018, 06:48 PM
Post: #3
RE: Greenhouses cost of transplants
WC

I did some work for Coleman, that old Hippie, he has put quite an effort into his enterprise.

He had some good soils and nice level ground for Cape Rosier and of course being somewhat sheltered by the wind from the hill to the west and the moderating temperatures coming off Penobscot Bay he was well situated for growing "cold" crops. There are other ideal areas similar to his but if you get inland the areas diminish.

I often have to wonder how many of these greenhouse businesses, or other three year businesses, are viable concerns and how many are tax write-offs to keep the family busy while the main money making business gets benefit from the periodic "loss".
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