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TOXIC POISONS inour WATER
03-25-2016, 08:32 AM
Post: #11
RE: TOXIC POISONS inour WATER
Most crops are fertilized with some sort of waste, it could be water, manure. They used to shovel out the outhouse in the old days a use that.
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03-25-2016, 01:02 PM
Post: #12
RE: TOXIC POISONS inour WATER
Nothing grows in a pure environment, something the environazi's forget (* not saying anyone here is one). Lakes have become so pure they're losing their ecosystem, which is a travesty, because man thinks it can outsmart nature. Extremes in both directions are harmful. Toxins in moderation are helpful, but they have to be the right toxins and in the right proportions.
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03-26-2016, 05:23 AM
Post: #13
RE: TOXIC POISONS inour WATER
QUOTE: - "That is not to say it's all clean, far from it. I've worked at and managed Hazardous Waste sites (Superfund) where you could light the water coming out of the ground on fire with a lighter. Guess what, it was legal to discharge it at the time." ... So as manager of a Superfund Toxic Waste Site you went along with discharging The leachate that was so Toxic & Full of Chemicals and Volatile Compounds that the "Produced Water" catches fire because of Why again??? Because it was "Legal" at the time? Where was this site that you managed? Love Canal or in my back yard here in Old Town??? - https://www.propublica.org/article/scien...o-fracking
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03-28-2016, 09:09 AM (This post was last modified: 03-28-2016 09:20 AM by Abacus.)
Post: #14
RE: TOXIC POISONS inour WATER
(03-26-2016 05:23 AM)Ralph Coffman Wrote:  QUOTE: - "That is not to say it's all clean, far from it. I've worked at and managed Hazardous Waste sites (Superfund) where you could light the water coming out of the ground on fire with a lighter. Guess what, it was legal to discharge it at the time." ... So as manager of a Superfund Toxic Waste Site you went along with discharging The leachate that was so Toxic & Full of Chemicals and Volatile Compounds that the "Produced Water" catches fire because of Why again??? Because it was "Legal" at the time? Where was this site that you managed? Love Canal or in my back yard here in Old Town??? - https://www.propublica.org/article/scien...o-fracking


Please attempt to comprehend what was written or ask questions rather than making wild absurd accusations, like you are now. It makes you look stupid. This is exactly the reason for the Flint, Michigan mess: people running off half-cocked with misinformation and no knowledge of the laws or timeline.

Nowhere did I mention discharging leachate anywhere. The sample referenced was headed into the treatment plant on site. The engineering company I worked for was contracted for expertise in operating the already built treatment plant, which was designed and installed by another engineering company. They could build it but didn't have the knowledge to run it, which is not uncommon in this field (that alone should scare you).

The site was the former Union Chemical Site on Route 17 in South Hope. "The 12-acre Union Chemical Company, Inc. site is located in South Hope, Maine. The Union Chemical Company began operations on site in 1967, formulating paint and coating strippers. In 1969, the company expanded its operations and began handling and recovering petrochemical-based solvents. In 1976, the company received a state permit for an underground disposal system (a septic system) for its process wastewater. On-site soil and groundwater contamination resulted from a combination of leaking stored drums and spills, and the use of the permitted septic system for disposal of the process wastewater."

Since I was born in 1968, I hardly think I had anything to do with the site contamination. I was brought on in September 1996 to manage the site, which was fraught with operational issues. The site went from 30% "up" time to more than 98% "up" time (when the site was working), which is pretty incredible given the very involved and poorly engineered system. A 100% "up" time was impossible due to having to shut systems down for cleaning and repair, like the Thermox (thermal oxidizer) that used 25 gallons of propane an hour to burn off the contaminated air (we pulled a vacuum on the ground) that created acid in the stack, corroding it.

What the articles referenced do not say, and I learned this from local residents with whom I had to coordinate and collect well water samples for routine testing, along with other site involved parties, is that the DEP actually created some of the mess with their sampling of the 2,000 drums on site. They had a robot punch a hole in the top of the drum to draw a sample for analysis and identification that resulted in spilling some on the site. I do not know the veracity of this but coming from numerous sources at different times I believe it has some element of credibility.

We forced hot air into the ground, which had a 4' clay cap to prevent rainwater from entering, to dry out the ground and suck off the vapors. To do this we had to depress the water table so the air could dry it out. This also created a bowl effect to draw in clean water from outside the site to keep the contamination in place. So we pumped down the water table and treated it in the building, added hot air at 750°F and pulled a vacuum on the site, which was burned in the Thermox. For the last 2 years we pumped potassium permanganate (KMnO4, an oxidizer, similar to bleach or hydrogen peroxide but nicer) into the ground to attack some of the contaminants in place ("in situ"). KMnO4 is bright purple but when it is used up in the oxidation process it turns clear, so we knew how much we had to add without needing to overdose. This greatly reduced the time needed for cleanup and saved about 2 years off the timeline.

Interestingly enough, I have property off Quiggle Brook, which the cleaned well water discharged to, so I had a vested interest in seeing the site cleaned and done properly (as if I would ever do the contrary).

Boy do I have some stories of that place, like a coworker who arrived to help me pull a pump. We were dressed up in full tyvek suits, hard hats, and safety glasses, and he splashed some water on his face from the pump tube. When he wiped off his glasses the mirrored coating came right off. We couldn't wear face shields due to them fogging up but he was extra careful after that.

He called me one morning about a phone pole that caught on fire due to the hot air drying out the ground and creating a preferential pathway. I had him shut down the hot air injection wells near it and put it out. We identified which one it was and kept it off, but stuff like that always cropped up to keep you on your toes.

It almost became South Hope Harbor when one of the propane delivery drivers (we took 10,000 gallons every 2-3 weeks) left his truck when it was offloading and the vent on the main 18,000 gallon tank snapped off, dumping straight propane into the air. I shut down his truck and reamed him out, never saw him again for a delivery.

It was difficult and challenging but makes for some great stories looking back on it.
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03-30-2016, 10:38 AM
Post: #15
RE: TOXIC POISONS inour WATER
*** POVERTY PROFITEERS *** - We are being sold out to Foreign Corporations who Privatize our Public Water Companies and Ripe us off with scores of schemes & scams... Read here how the 'Gangster Banksters' & their 'Vulture Teams' are like 'Foreign Carpetbaggers'. These are the Modern Day "Poverty Profiteers" from away... http://www.alternet.org/environment/unex...w.facebook
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03-30-2016, 07:12 PM
Post: #16
RE: TOXIC POISONS inour WATER
(03-28-2016 09:09 AM)Abacus Wrote:  
(03-26-2016 05:23 AM)Ralph Coffman Wrote:  QUOTE: - "That is not to say it's all clean, far from it. I've worked at and managed Hazardous Waste sites (Superfund) where you could light the water coming out of the ground on fire with a lighter. Guess what, it was legal to discharge it at the time." ... So as manager of a Superfund Toxic Waste Site you went along with discharging The leachate that was so Toxic & Full of Chemicals and Volatile Compounds that the "Produced Water" catches fire because of Why again??? Because it was "Legal" at the time? Where was this site that you managed? Love Canal or in my back yard here in Old Town??? - https://www.propublica.org/article/scien...o-fracking


Please attempt to comprehend what was written or ask questions rather than making wild absurd accusations, like you are now. It makes you look stupid. This is exactly the reason for the Flint, Michigan mess: people running off half-cocked with misinformation and no knowledge of the laws or timeline.

Nowhere did I mention discharging leachate anywhere. The sample referenced was headed into the treatment plant on site. The engineering company I worked for was contracted for expertise in operating the already built treatment plant, which was designed and installed by another engineering company. They could build it but didn't have the knowledge to run it, which is not uncommon in this field (that alone should scare you).

The site was the former Union Chemical Site on Route 17 in South Hope. "The 12-acre Union Chemical Company, Inc. site is located in South Hope, Maine. The Union Chemical Company began operations on site in 1967, formulating paint and coating strippers. In 1969, the company expanded its operations and began handling and recovering petrochemical-based solvents. In 1976, the company received a state permit for an underground disposal system (a septic system) for its process wastewater. On-site soil and groundwater contamination resulted from a combination of leaking stored drums and spills, and the use of the permitted septic system for disposal of the process wastewater."

Since I was born in 1968, I hardly think I had anything to do with the site contamination. I was brought on in September 1996 to manage the site, which was fraught with operational issues. The site went from 30% "up" time to more than 98% "up" time (when the site was working), which is pretty incredible given the very involved and poorly engineered system. A 100% "up" time was impossible due to having to shut systems down for cleaning and repair, like the Thermox (thermal oxidizer) that used 25 gallons of propane an hour to burn off the contaminated air (we pulled a vacuum on the ground) that created acid in the stack, corroding it.

What the articles referenced do not say, and I learned this from local residents with whom I had to coordinate and collect well water samples for routine testing, along with other site involved parties, is that the DEP actually created some of the mess with their sampling of the 2,000 drums on site. They had a robot punch a hole in the top of the drum to draw a sample for analysis and identification that resulted in spilling some on the site. I do not know the veracity of this but coming from numerous sources at different times I believe it has some element of credibility.

We forced hot air into the ground, which had a 4' clay cap to prevent rainwater from entering, to dry out the ground and suck off the vapors. To do this we had to depress the water table so the air could dry it out. This also created a bowl effect to draw in clean water from outside the site to keep the contamination in place. So we pumped down the water table and treated it in the building, added hot air at 750°F and pulled a vacuum on the site, which was burned in the Thermox. For the last 2 years we pumped potassium permanganate (KMnO4, an oxidizer, similar to bleach or hydrogen peroxide but nicer) into the ground to attack some of the contaminants in place ("in situ"). KMnO4 is bright purple but when it is used up in the oxidation process it turns clear, so we knew how much we had to add without needing to overdose. This greatly reduced the time needed for cleanup and saved about 2 years off the timeline.

Interestingly enough, I have property off Quiggle Brook, which the cleaned well water discharged to, so I had a vested interest in seeing the site cleaned and done properly (as if I would ever do the contrary).

Boy do I have some stories of that place, like a coworker who arrived to help me pull a pump. We were dressed up in full tyvek suits, hard hats, and safety glasses, and he splashed some water on his face from the pump tube. When he wiped off his glasses the mirrored coating came right off. We couldn't wear face shields due to them fogging up but he was extra careful after that.

He called me one morning about a phone pole that caught on fire due to the hot air drying out the ground and creating a preferential pathway. I had him shut down the hot air injection wells near it and put it out. We identified which one it was and kept it off, but stuff like that always cropped up to keep you on your toes.

It almost became South Hope Harbor when one of the propane delivery drivers (we took 10,000 gallons every 2-3 weeks) left his truck when it was offloading and the vent on the main 18,000 gallon tank snapped off, dumping straight propane into the air. I shut down his truck and reamed him out, never saw him again for a delivery.

It was difficult and challenging but makes for some great stories looking back on it.
.

Thanks for sharing. Interesting...
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