Post Reply 
 
Thread Rating:
  • 0 Votes - 0 Average
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Dried Beans and Potatoes
03-01-2016, 07:10 AM
Post: #1
Dried Beans and Potatoes
The last five years or so, I have been growing a fair amount of dried beans. I like the idea of having a good supply of them on hand. I have read that properly stored, they will keep up to 20 years. They are nutritious and you can plant them if you can't get seed. I buy my seed from Fedco Seeds here in Maine. http://www.fedcoseeds.com/seeds/?cat=Beans
I don't like that they have sometimes put political commentary in their catalog, but they have a good variety on most things and they are in state. I get my potato seed from their Moose Tubers branch. http://www.fedcoseeds.com/moose/search.php

I have grown their Black Turtle, Calypso, Hutterite, Jacob's Cattle, Kenearly, King of the Early, Marfax, Red Kidney, Soldier, Vermont Cranberry and a few others that they are not carrying this year. My favorites are Jacob's Cattle, Marfax and Red Kidney.

For potatoes I grow their Elba, Kennebec and Santina.
Find all posts by this user
Quote this message in a reply
03-01-2016, 07:29 AM (This post was last modified: 03-01-2016 07:29 AM by Ugene.)
Post: #2
RE: Dried Beans and Potatoes
MD, or anyone else.
If you need potato seed just give me a PM.
I usually grow around twenty varieties, not counting my experimental lines.
No need to feed the GMO paranoia at Fedco.

Is it considered a conspiracy if they really are after you?Huh
Find all posts by this user
Quote this message in a reply
03-01-2016, 08:03 AM
Post: #3
RE: Dried Beans and Potatoes
How hard the beans to grown and dry, I usually have a few pounds on the shelf, Maine Quality brand. The wife thinks it is cheaper just buy them, I would rather grow them
Find all posts by this user
Quote this message in a reply
03-01-2016, 09:15 AM (This post was last modified: 03-02-2016 09:31 AM by Maine Democrat.)
Post: #4
RE: Dried Beans and Potatoes
(03-01-2016 08:03 AM)Islander Wrote:  How hard the beans to grown and dry, I usually have a few pounds on the shelf, Maine Quality brand. The wife thinks it is cheaper just buy them, I would rather grow them

They are pretty easy to grow. The only problem is they loose their waterproofing after they ripen so you need to remove the beans when they are ready or they will rot. Any bean touching the grown will rot as well. I loose early beans often because they ripen when I am flat out haying and can't get to them in time. The Jacob's Cattle bean is a very upright plant that holds the pods away from the ground. They are the easiest to harvest.

When most of the pods are ripe, I pull the plants and then remove the pods. I put the pods in open cardboard boxes and put them upstairs in my barn. They will need more drying, so on a bright sunny day, I spread them out in the sun for one day only and then back into the boxes to be stored in a dry place until I can fine time to shell the pods.

Yes, it would be cheaper to buy, but if you like gardening they're not that difficult. There is some satisfaction in knowing where your food came from. Most meals at our home include vegetables wholly grown on our land with game I harvest myself.
Find all posts by this user
Quote this message in a reply
03-01-2016, 09:30 AM
Post: #5
RE: Dried Beans and Potatoes
We raise several varieties, Yellow eyes, Navy and a recent one we have discovered, Appaloosa. Vermont Bean Seed company has lots of varieties!

We save our seeds so we don't have to buy much in any given year. It is pretty easy to do and very economical.

We have bunched bean plants up and hung them upside down in our barn and we have hung them on lines outdoors and they work well either way. You can take a 30 gal plastic garbage pail (hopefully NOT used) and pick up the plants and bang them on the inside of the can and they will shell themselves out quite nicely. Then you can use a fan and "winnow" them as they do blueberries.

My dad used to say that dried beans were the very best dried foods to keep as they last forever....and could stand a "nuclear strike".

We keep them in glass jars and half gallon Ball canning jars, they keep for years in our cellar.

WC
Find all posts by this user
Quote this message in a reply
03-01-2016, 10:48 AM
Post: #6
RE: Dried Beans and Potatoes
Well, it sounds easy I will give it a go this year along with the cukes, tomatoes, greens, tomatillos, hot peppers etc. We have narrowed it down over the years
Find all posts by this user
Quote this message in a reply
03-02-2016, 09:25 AM
Post: #7
RE: Dried Beans and Potatoes
Dried beans were carried on both merchant ships and naval vessels for centuries before there was any sort of cold food storage available. As America west of the Mississippi was being settled between 1865 and 1900 most all the cowboys and other travellers by horseback, carried the beans in their saddlebags.

They are truly a "durable" food and could keep on alive for some time in a SHTF situation.

WC
Find all posts by this user
Quote this message in a reply
03-08-2016, 06:07 PM (This post was last modified: 03-10-2016 10:41 AM by Maine Democrat.)
Post: #8
RE: Dried Beans and Potatoes
One year I grew 11 varieties of dry beans. My wife put a handfull of each in this jar. The names of the beans are (top down)
Vermont Cranberry, Yellow Eye, Black Turtle, Soldier, Marfax, Cannellini, Jacob's Cattle, Hutterite, King of the Early, Maine Sunset and Tiger Eye.

[Image: 20160310_095938_1.jpg]
Find all posts by this user
Quote this message in a reply
03-09-2016, 07:12 AM
Post: #9
RE: Dried Beans and Potatoes
Nice, we are going to try some this year
Find all posts by this user
Quote this message in a reply
03-09-2016, 09:50 PM
Post: #10
RE: Dried Beans and Potatoes
Can you tell us the names of the 11 varieties in that jar.

WC
Find all posts by this user
Quote this message in a reply
Post Reply 


Forum Jump:


User(s) browsing this thread: 1 Guest(s)

Contact Us | My Site | Return to Top | Return to Content | Lite (Archive) Mode | RSS Syndication