Post Reply 
 
Thread Rating:
  • 0 Votes - 0 Average
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Backpacking The World
02-26-2016, 10:34 AM
Post: #1
Backpacking The World
I did a little backpacking in the Army, I don’t do it as much anymore, but you never know when you might need to. My Father in-law hiked the Appalachian Trail from Georgia to Maine and learned a thing or two about backpacking. http://www.nps.gov/appa/index.htm

This Christmas he gave me a Solo Stove Titan and a Solo Stove Pot 1800.
http://www.solostove.com/
The stove fits right inside the pot to take up less room. You just need a few twigs to cook, sterilize water or what have you. I am really intrigued and can’t wait to use it.

Many Maine Guides provide backpacking services.
https://maineguides.com/activity/trail-g...ckpacking/

There is a lot of backpacking going on so please share your tips and adventures here.
Find all posts by this user
Quote this message in a reply
02-27-2016, 10:31 AM
Post: #2
RE: Backpacking The World
I am an avid hiker and own a TON of gear. I've hiked all the NH 4000 foot mountains in winter and in non-winter. I've section hiked most of the northern Appalachian Trail and go backpacking often. I also work in water treatment and advise people on that area when they ask.

Any questions?
Find all posts by this user
Quote this message in a reply
02-27-2016, 02:59 PM
Post: #3
RE: Backpacking The World
Abacus, wow all of the 4000 footers!!! http://www.4000footers.com/nh.shtml
There can’t be many that have done that. How long did it take to get them all? I have always wanted to hike some of them, but haven’t taken the time yet. The only NH mountains I have hiked are North and South Baldface. http://www.summitpost.org/north-baldface...ace/180510 The views were great!

If I was to start hiking them, which one would you recommend first and can most of them be hiked in a day? Which one is your favorite?

My summer hiking boots are Hi-Tek Altitude and I am on my third pair looking to try something new. http://us.hi-tec.com/altitude-v-brown.html I can barely get a season out of them before the sole separates in the front. I don’t like the traction they give as they are a little slippery on wet rock. Can you recommend a summer hiking boot?

I bought a set of Keen Summit Country III winter boots to use this winter and I like them. http://www.keenfootwear.com/product/shoe...county-iii I don’t take real long hikes in them so they have been warm enough. For extra traction on ice, I have been using Hillsound crampons. For what I do, they provide amazing traction on ice and fit a wide range of boots. I was able to stretch them onto my big insulated boots one cold morning. http://www.llbean.com/llb/shop/71548?fea...Id=1198252
Find all posts by this user
Quote this message in a reply
02-28-2016, 11:29 AM
Post: #4
RE: Backpacking The World
(02-26-2016 10:34 AM)Maine Democrat Wrote:  I did a little backpacking in the Army, I don’t do it as much anymore, but you never know when you might need to. My Father in-law hiked the Appalachian Trail from Georgia to Maine and learned a thing or two about backpacking. http://www.nps.gov/appa/index.htm

This Christmas he gave me a Solo Stove Titan and a Solo Stove Pot 1800.
http://www.solostove.com/
The stove fits right inside the pot to take up less room. You just need a few twigs to cook, sterilize water or what have you. I am really intrigued and can’t wait to use it.

Many Maine Guides provide backpacking services.
https://maineguides.com/activity/trail-g...ckpacking/

There is a lot of backpacking going on so please share your tips and adventures here.

I hiked "The Trail" with Grandma Gatewood, She was the first Woman to hike the Appalachian Trail all the way through. She did this when she turned 67 ! - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Okp90YkM...CnCCaBIlGg - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sd1uqeL78bw
Find all posts by this user
Quote this message in a reply
02-28-2016, 07:25 PM
Post: #5
RE: Backpacking The World
Ralph Coffman writes,

"I hiked "The Trail" with Grandma Gatewood, She was the first Woman to hike the Appalachian Trail all the way through. She did this when she turned 67 ! - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Okp90YkM...CnCCaBIlGg - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sd1uqeL78bw
[/quote]

Fantastic Ralph! I have wanted to do it, but haven't had the time or the money to do it yet. I guess that is why a lot of retired folks hike it. I may get a chance yet. How old were you when you did it? Thanks for the links, I will forward to two people I know that hiked the trail.
Find all posts by this user
Quote this message in a reply
02-29-2016, 03:15 PM (This post was last modified: 02-29-2016 03:28 PM by Abacus.)
Post: #6
RE: Backpacking The World
(02-27-2016 02:59 PM)Maine Democrat Wrote:  Abacus, wow all of the 4000 footers!!! http://www.4000footers.com/nh.shtml
There can’t be many that have done that.

There are more than you think, around 10,000 the last I knew that completed the 4,000 footer list in non-winter and 600 that have completed them in winter. Winter can be brutal, as you can imagine, with the world's worst weather ready to change at any time. I have had conditions changed in 1/2 an hour with the temperatures dropping 50° due to an ice storm moving in. When above treeline there obviously isn't enough time to get off the mountain so you have to blow through it or shelter in place.

Quote:How long did it take to get them all? I have always wanted to hike some of them, but haven’t taken the time yet. The only NH mountains I have hiked are North and South Baldface. http://www.summitpost.org/north-baldface...ace/180510 The views were great!

Due to having to work every other weekend, and times scheduled with family, I completed them in about 5 years. There is a special patch if you complete them all in one season (either a year or the winter season) and those who live locally or are without jobs have the time to complete those lists.

Quote:If I was to start hiking them, which one would you recommend first and can most of them be hiked in a day?

All of them can be done in one day. I hiked most as dayhikes but this required an early start of around 3AM for the longer ones. I'd drive the 3 hours there, hike all day, come down after dark, get something to eat, and drive home arriving around midnight. On some of them I'd spend the $20 a night and stay at the Harvard Hut or HoJo's (Hermit Lake Shelter just south of Tuckerman Ravine), stealth camp on the side of the trail somewhere, or stay at Hiker's Paradise for $20 a night. At least it's a warm bed and in the area.

I would recommend Mt Jackson to start since it is a smaller hike with awesome views up the Presidential Range and good parking. Next on the list is Pierce, but Eisenhower is close if you have the time, only about another mile but it's all above treeline so you need a good day.

Moosilauke is another good mountain with great views but very exposed with a long above treeline stretch. There used to be a hotel at the top and the carriage road is great for sledding down in the winter. It takes longer to get there since it's on the other end of the Kanc.

The Kinsman's are also good and you have to pass by Lonesome Lake Hut, which is open all year and a good place to refill water or get something to eat. You also have outstanding views of the Lafayette Range across the valley but many people have died doing that, so I'd save it for later. I was caught up there in February when an unexpected blizzard moved in that made hiking nearly impossible, but we made it down OK despite the 66 mph sustained winds (as recorded on a handheld anemometer). Took 2 hours to find the car once we were down and then we had to go south to Mass because all the roads north of there (and the Kanc) were closed. I didn't get home until 5AM.

Quote:Which one is your favorite?

I like Monroe mainly due to the Jewel Trail, which is outstanding but long and steep. Adams has a special place in my heart due to it being my first but it has some of the most elevation gain due to the trail starting so low. Moriah is nice in non-winter since it's an easy hike with nice views, just a lot of ledge that stays icy. Jackson can be done in just a few hours, so up and back before lunch, but the views leave you longing for more since you're looking uphill at the taller mountains.

Quote:My summer hiking boots are Hi-Tek Altitude and I am on my third pair looking to try something new. http://us.hi-tec.com/altitude-v-brown.html I can barely get a season out of them before the sole separates in the front. I don’t like the traction they give as they are a little slippery on wet rock. Can you recommend a summer hiking boot?

I don't wear actual boots in the 3 seasons because they are heavy and hot, so I use trail runners even though I don't run. They're lighter with a stiffer sole, and often waterproof. Montrail, Vasque, la Sportiva, Oboz, Merrell, and several others make outstanding shoes that you won't go wrong with, just try them on before you buy. Keep in mind that EMS changed their policy so now if you use them you own them, no returns.

Quote:I bought a set of Keen Summit Country III winter boots to use this winter and I like them. http://www.keenfootwear.com/product/shoe...county-iii I don’t take real long hikes in them so they have been warm enough. For extra traction on ice, I have been using Hillsound crampons. For what I do, they provide amazing traction on ice and fit a wide range of boots. I was able to stretch them onto my big insulated boots one cold morning. http://www.llbean.com/llb/shop/71548?fea...Id=1198252

Those look like nice boots and they'd be fine for the smaller mountains. I have a similar set of Merrells that I use. But they won't be very warm and cold feet will make for a miserable hike. For cold days, which is pretty much anything in winter when the temps are below 30°, I use a double plastic boot. I have some Koflach Degree's and Scarpa Alpha's that are both good to -40°. It may seem like overkill but more often than not it's what's needed.

What's nice about them is that they'll take a lot of abuse and will accept a step-in crampon. This year crampons were not needed for the hikes and most people used the Trampons like you have (I have a set) or the Kahtoola Microspikes. When winter sets in like past years snowshoes are a requirement as well, but nothing too large as they won't fit down the trail. Very little bushwacking is needed so no need for the wide ones. If anything, ones with a good built-in crampon are needed for hiking up the steep parts.

There are whole sites, like TMC, that have just hiking people on them. Often times I'll hook up with a group to hike, which is safer for the winter peaks. But, there is nothing quite like hiking solo and at your own pace either. Some of the best times I had hiking were on my own and I didn't need to match a pace or wait on anyone. It can be more dangerous, like when I impaled my eye on a branch about 5 miles into the woods. I was OK but it was a little unnerving until the blood stopped.

The White Mountains can kill you if you aren't prepared, but picking a good day and using your head will get you up and down most of them without an issue. After the first few you'll develop a system and rhythm to hiking that makes them more comfortable, even moreso when done with friends.

Ralph, you hiked with Grandma Gatewood? Wow, talk about a lifetime experience! That is some serious bragging rights there. I always wanted to meet Bill Irwin, who hiked the whole Appalachian Trail blind and was sorry to hear of his passing in 2014. I've met some nice people out there and made some great memories. The wife and I still hike and I'm working on the Hundred Highest List now, but not in winter (yet). Grandma proved that you don't need to spend gobs of money on equipment and fancy clothes to enjoy hiking, something most people have forgotten. I haven't and sourced the vast majority of my stuff from Goodwill, which is why my trail name is Lawn Sale. "Function over beauty" are words to live by.
Find all posts by this user
Quote this message in a reply
02-29-2016, 03:28 PM
Post: #7
RE: Backpacking The World
Thanks, Abacus for being a resource! That is some very useful information and perspective.
Find all posts by this user
Quote this message in a reply
03-01-2016, 09:08 AM
Post: #8
RE: Backpacking The World
After hiking with Grandma Gatewood I finally got a backpack and started Hiking/Hitchiking. I First started in Europe, then America, North Africa, and as far east as Turkey. I started at 17. I preferred the experiences that meeting people presented over when I wandered in wilderness areas. Also, just to be clear, I didn't walk the entire trail with Grandma Gatewood, just a few steps. Furthermore "The Trail" was not the Appalachian trail but the Oregon Trail! Yes Grandma Gatewood hiked that Trail as well as doing our Appalachian Trail Twice. All hiked after she reached her upper Sixties. *note - all you old guys need to come out of "Retirement" and get to work fixing the mess you have left our world in. No Mo Excuses ! - http://cartoons.rhodesandrose.com/wp-con...Tcolor.jpg
Find all posts by this user
Quote this message in a reply
04-08-2016, 06:44 PM (This post was last modified: 04-08-2016 06:45 PM by Maine Democrat.)
Post: #9
RE: Backpacking The World
I am sure many of you know these tricks, but I didn't.

Beginner Basics: Corrective Boot Tying
Having boot trouble on the trail? You might be able to save your day, and your feet, just by using these simple lacing solutions. Combine them as necessary to get the comfort you want - See more at: http://www.backpacker.com/view/photos/sk...#bp=0/img1
Find all posts by this user
Quote this message in a reply
04-09-2016, 04:13 PM
Post: #10
RE: Backpacking The World
I got tired of slipping with my Hi-Tek Alititude boots and bought a pair of Salomon Authentic LTR CS WP with contragrip soles for summer climbing.
http://www.amazon.com/Salomon-Mens-Authe...B00IEYW0I4

I can't wait to try them but I am recovering from a back injury so it may be another week.
Find all posts by this user
Quote this message in a reply
Post Reply 


Forum Jump:


User(s) browsing this thread: 1 Guest(s)

Contact Us | My Site | Return to Top | Return to Content | Lite (Archive) Mode | RSS Syndication