Post Reply 
 
Thread Rating:
  • 0 Votes - 0 Average
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Beef Jerky
09-03-2016, 09:40 PM
Post: #11
RE: Beef Jerky
Along with many of the ideas in the "prepper" thread, drying food has been one of the oldest methods of preserving it that there is.

Dried meat, and dried fish, can be put in boiling water and "reconstituted" to quite an extent and make a nice hearty broth!

I used to dry codfish as a lad. I would split them down the back, instead of the belly, that way the guts would still come out, but you could easily remove the backbone also and you would have the fish skin with a fillet on each edge. We used to dissolve all the salt that we could into a 5 gal bucket of water and soak the fish in them for 24 hrs or more. The salt will drive out whatever blood is still in the flesh so that the fish can be dried outdoors without attracting flies. They will leave it alone, guaranteed!

Then I would hang them up on my mother's clothesline, much to her consternation I suspect. Once dried in the sun, this will last almost indefinitely with no care at all. I have not done meat but believe the same process will work just fine. The old cowboys used to carry these kinds of provisions in their saddle bags as they would keep about forever. The dehydrator does pretty well what the sun can do and quicker!

Google search: LEM Products

They sell all kinds of stuff for processing your own meat, and making beef and other jerkys. I have a hamburg grinder from them that is a noble machine that did NOT cost an arm and a leg! They have all kinds of things for making jerky, from tools to cut the meat into thin pieces, to all kinds of flavorings etc. They have a great selection. I buy sausage seasonings from them every fall!

WC
Find all posts by this user
Quote this message in a reply
09-04-2016, 07:17 AM
Post: #12
RE: Beef Jerky
Just a little tidbit about preparing a salt brine:
Crack an egg into the water and keep adding salt until the egg floats.
The specific gravity of the egg compared to the salt/water mixture will equalize when the correct ratio is reached.

Is it considered a conspiracy if they really are after you?Huh
Find all posts by this user
Quote this message in a reply
09-04-2016, 11:28 AM
Post: #13
RE: Beef Jerky
(09-03-2016 09:40 PM)woodcanoe Wrote:  Along with many of the ideas in the "prepper" thread, drying food has been one of the oldest methods of preserving it that there is.

Dried meat, and dried fish, can be put in boiling water and "reconstituted" to quite an extent and make a nice hearty broth!

I used to dry codfish as a lad. I would split them down the back, instead of the belly, that way the guts would still come out, but you could easily remove the backbone also and you would have the fish skin with a fillet on each edge. We used to dissolve all the salt that we could into a 5 gal bucket of water and soak the fish in them for 24 hrs or more. The salt will drive out whatever blood is still in the flesh so that the fish can be dried outdoors without attracting flies. They will leave it alone, guaranteed!

Then I would hang them up on my mother's clothesline, much to her consternation I suspect. Once dried in the sun, this will last almost indefinitely with no care at all. I have not done meat but believe the same process will work just fine. The old cowboys used to carry these kinds of provisions in their saddle bags as they would keep about forever. The dehydrator does pretty well what the sun can do and quicker!

Google search: LEM Products

They sell all kinds of stuff for processing your own meat, and making beef and other jerkys. I have a hamburg grinder from them that is a noble machine that did NOT cost an arm and a leg! They have all kinds of things for making jerky, from tools to cut the meat into thin pieces, to all kinds of flavorings etc. They have a great selection. I buy sausage seasonings from them every fall!

WC

Thanks, WC. I've seen all the old pictures of cod drying on racks outside and could never understand why they weren't covered in flies. I'll give it a try. I have lots of my mother's recipes that call for salt cod.
Find all posts by this user
Quote this message in a reply
09-05-2016, 05:50 PM
Post: #14
RE: Beef Jerky
I like Good Eats - Alton Brown gets to the science of cooking - what I learned from him is that you do not want to cook the meat. Rather than "desert" conditions (dry heat), he says the "arctic" conditions (dry cool or cold) conditions are best. Most "store-bought" dehydrators use heating elements and fans that bring the meat to 140°F and cook it. He uses a marinade and layers of cheap paper furnace filters with the meat in between bungee-corded to a regular household box fan. I have not tried it yet (I know, I'm an internet warrior), but this Fall we will use the cool or cold dry method.

The Three Godly institutions - Marriage, Family, Government - are being attacked. We must fight with integrity and love for all humanity. 1 Peter 2:16- Act as free men, and do not use your freedom as a covering for evil...
Find all posts by this user
Quote this message in a reply
09-05-2016, 09:04 PM
Post: #15
RE: Beef Jerky
I smoke my own meat.Took me a bit to really get onto it but I love doing it and stuff tastes really good. We do all our bacon, and other things, and it works real well.

The process we use is called "Cold Smoking" and the idea is to NOT cook the meat. We keep the temp below 160 degrees, for the 8 hrs it takes to "smoke" the meat.

Actually the "smoking" part of the process is the easiest, and quickest part. Preparation is where the real knowledge needs to be as it is critical to "cure" the meat (to prevent bacteria growth) before it can be smoked, and the curing can take up to three weeks depending upon how large, and thick, the piece of meat is. Something like bacon that is only an inch or a little more thick can be done in about 8 days. Ham takes three weeks by contrast as it takes time for the cure to get to the inner part of it.

I use a "sugar cure" produced by the Morton salt people. It is sugar and salt combined. A certain amount, based on the weight of the meat, is rubbed into it on all sides. Then I place them in plastic bags and stick them in the refigerator for the time needed. I take about a week to cure bacon, turning the bag over every day. Then it all goes into the smoker (repurposed gas grill) for 8 hrs of smoke. That part needs one to pay attention as you don't want too much heat, but just enough fire to make lots of smoke.

Salt and sugar cured smoked meats, if done right can be kept in a cool place for quite a long time. My grandmother used to hang bacon and ham in the cellar stairway and it would hang there for months as they ate it a piece at a time. I freeze mine just so I can keep it for as long as I want. When it's cool in the fall I hang some up in the back door entry where it is cool and it makes the whole kitchen smell real good!

I stayed away from smoking for years as I was afraid that I would not be able to deal with the curing process but it really is not all that hard as long as you pay attention.

The LEM company that I linked to above has lots of books on doing all this stuff including making jerky. I have that book too but have not tried it yet. We have two calves now so we will have some beef critters here someday soon and then we will give it a shot!

Again, this is just another way that old timers used to preserve meat, fish and other things, without refigerators!

Good skills to have in case a SHTF deal comes along some day!

WC
Find all posts by this user
Quote this message in a reply
09-06-2016, 07:14 AM
Post: #16
RE: Beef Jerky
I use quite a few products from this place.
Good people to deal with, too.
Check out their Dad's recipe swap forum, and the BBQ/preservation forum.

http://www.theingredientstore.com/

Is it considered a conspiracy if they really are after you?Huh
Find all posts by this user
Quote this message in a reply
Post Reply 


Forum Jump:


User(s) browsing this thread: 1 Guest(s)

Contact Us | My Site | Return to Top | Return to Content | Lite (Archive) Mode | RSS Syndication