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Commercial Fishing
02-23-2016, 08:22 AM
Post: #11
RE: Commercial Fishing
Well I figured you know of them, how about the Holland's, I think Glenn is either from there or at least has relatives and a connection to the Billings yard.
M.D. Dad is Sonny from Kennbunkport, still buying and selling at a young 87
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02-23-2016, 01:07 PM (This post was last modified: 02-23-2016 01:07 PM by Maine Democrat.)
Post: #12
RE: Commercial Fishing
OMG I have been out of the lobster business so long I didn't know how screwed up it is with over regulation.
Zones, legal haul times, whale entanglement reduction plan rules, etc. to no end. One look at this page made me want to scream.
http://www.maine.gov/dmr/rm/lobster/index.htm
I can't imagine dealing with all this over-analyst, reports and regulations.

I like how fishermen and nature regulate.
If there is not enough fish "here", you move over "there".
Then "here" gets a break to build back up.
If you can't make enough money doing "this", then you do "that". "This" recovers until you can make money at it again.
If you can't make a go of it fishing, you do something else, leaving more resource for others.
It is self regulating and needs no government interference.
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02-23-2016, 02:38 PM
Post: #13
RE: Commercial Fishing
Isn't all that "gobbledygook" something pretty special? This is what happens when we let "overeducated fools" have way too much leash!

If you click on my link re "Penobscot East" in the earlier post you can read several paragraphs where they tell us all about their (almost holy) mission! Did you ever notice that when you see this kind of a screed, from our "betters" whether it is some goobermint operation, non-profit saviour, or even the public school higher ups, you always see the same thing. You see great long flowing paragraphs, using lots of ten letter words, and ending up saying almost "not a goddamn thing" as they say downeast. My dear old 7th grade language teacher would have "emasculated" the fool who wrote that "over wordy" tome! "You're using too many words....again" she would bellow at me. You don't forget those kinds of lessons from those kinds of teachers! I was terrified of her at the time, but have loved her, and thanked her, ever since.

A friend from the past, Mike Brown of Northport, ME used to be the editor of the Belfast Republican Journal and was a staunch downeast conservative I tell you. I used to subscribe to the journal just to read his stuff. I loved the man.

What many people don't know is that way back in the day, the Maine Coast Fisherman paper was published in Rockland, and had all kinds of good stuff about fishing, small boats and more, and akways carried this little "commentary" piece in every issue called "Captain Perc Sane".

Captain Sane used to talk in an extreme downeast dialect and had cute little names for many things. FISHCRATS was his name for people like Ted Ames and his wife. Capt Sane held them in very low regard.

Mike Brown created, and wrote, Capt Perc Sane's funny stuff for decades. It was a true treasure!

By "Glenn Holland" do you mean the fiberglass boat builder, and god father of the great racing lobster boat "Red Baron" yes I do know him. I believe his father's name was Corliss. I think the Holland family was all from Stonington originally. Glen lives in either Searsport or Stockton Springs, can't remember which. I have been to his house but it was a long time back. There are still "Hollands" around the Island.

I think his dad worked on the Belfast tug boats for many years and that is why he left the Island I think.

Here is a picture of Glenn's greatest creation, "Red Baron" at speed. I think the photo was taken in Stonington some years back.
[Image: redbaron_zpsi947xmkd.jpg]


Famed downeast wooden lobster boat designer and builder, Royal Lowell designed many of Holland's molds.

Holland's Boat Shop website

WC
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02-23-2016, 03:41 PM
Post: #14
RE: Commercial Fishing
Yup one and the same, Glenn and Kathy live in Belfast with the shop being just off Rt1 across from Perry's Nut House. I had the pleasure of meeting Corliss at the races. Glenn's daughter worked for me a few years and her brother ED went to Maine Maritime and I think is working on tugs. Rumor has it that the Red Baron is coming out of retirement for a try at the speed record. It actually is a small, small world.
Loved Capt. Perce Sane, lots of good Downeast humor, with a good jab now and then.
as for rules, there is something new every year, whale breaks, log books, approved rope and on and on. A license for us costs $1000.00 a year.
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02-23-2016, 07:39 PM
Post: #15
RE: Commercial Fishing
If you used to read Cap't Perc Sane then you and I are pretty near the same vintage. The National Fisherman was a real nice little paper. There was lots of stuff related to fishing, all around the country. I used to read about the Bering Sea crab boats, and all of them that were lost in the early years. They used to have a few articles on the new tuna seiners built on the west coast and that fishery, mostly all gone now I think.

The papers that are produced now are nothing compared to that old paper in my book.

I have know Glenn since the late 60's. He was always into things that went fast. A friend and I went over to his house and picked up a 1939 Ford tudor that Glenn was building into a hot rod. We dragged it back to Stonington and proceeded to put a 413 Chrysler motor into it out of an early 60's Chrysler Imperial. Thank the gods for the fact we did NOT get it running.

WC
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02-24-2016, 05:20 AM
Post: #16
RE: Commercial Fishing
And he still has his antique Fords, obviously he has not changed.
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02-24-2016, 09:34 AM
Post: #17
RE: Commercial Fishing
Fishermen, their families and all the people around them generally work hard, but the play hard too, and most have a pretty good sense of humor......if you aren't cutting off their traps.


Glenn, with the Baron, really started all of what lobster boat racing has become today!

Of course the "Red Baron" was named after the famed German WWI ace, Baron von Richtoften. Lobster boat builders from Corea, ME, the Young Brothers were inspired, by Glenn's fine piece of work, to build a suitable contender.

So a 33 ft contender emerged from the Young Bros shop, a design by Ernest Libby, JR of Beals Island, the man that designed and built the wooden hulled 30 ft Margeurite G, owned by James Preston of Roques Bluffs, the first Maine lobster boat that could get up on a plane (clocked at 34 mph when THAT was fast).

So what to call this latest "racer". It seems that the best cartoon comic strip of that era was PEANUTS which often offered up the dog SNOOPY using his dog house as a fighter plane, in WWI, and after the Red Baron. So with a little bit of tongue in cheek, the Young Bros creation became the "Sopwith Camel" the WWI aircraft that was the hated enemy of the Red Baron......and race they did.

In the quest for speed where taking off weight is as important as adding power, these boats were built rather lightly, so light in fact, that they could bounce around considerably at speed when encountering waves. They were indeed very fast but also had an element of danger due to lack of weight/stability especially at these kinds of speeds. The operators of these speed demons were usually wearing a safety harness that kept them tethered at the wheel so they weren't thrown into the engine or out of the boat. They truly were "racers" in the tradition of Indy and Nascar!

Fishermen can laugh and joke, and do often. I have witnessed hundreds of very funny exchanges over the years. But fishermen also love to argue....and the can do that with great gusto.

Glenn's faction, and the Young Bros faction argued forever over the engines and anything else they could argue over. Well that engine has got too much compression, that one has a high rise manifold on it.....and so on. But nobody ever got hurt which is a good thing. And a lot of great fun was had by both competitors and fans. Stonington is still a zoo on race day even now.

My daughter was a passenger in a small outboard that was among the spectators at the races in the North Haven Thoroughfare a few years back. The boat she was in was run down, and demolished, not by a racer, but by an idiot in another outboard boat with a hundred horse motor on it. My daughter, and her two companions ended up in the water, but not badly hurt luckily. There was plenty of help and they were promptly rescued, But that accident shook up the locals and races were never held there again. The Fox Island's thoroughfare is very narrow at points and there is not a lot of room for all the boats that wanted to go there, so they stopped it.

Lobster boat racing has been a huge story, all by itself, and Glenn Holland was the guy that pretty well started the quest for truly high speed.....in a working boat. He has always had the reputation as a great "thinker" and a man who was always willing to head off in a new direction that nobody else had ever gone in before.

WC
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02-24-2016, 09:58 AM
Post: #18
RE: Commercial Fishing
I remember that race. When my son started lobstering in a skiff, he raced and won in his class. Not being athletic in school, he proudly took the trophy to school to show his coach, that finally he found a sport he as good at.
I think in one race, Glenn actually removed the windshield and cabin top in order to squeeze a little more speed out of it. And of course I am pretty sure the Baron is a wooden hull, which is even more impressive.
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02-24-2016, 01:25 PM
Post: #19
RE: Commercial Fishing
Have you ever seen "Uncle's UFO" owned by Andy Gove of Stonington race in the unlimited class?

Andy is probably overall the best fisherman I ever knew. Always tops at everything he did.

He has raced all over Maine in diesel and "free for all" classes. He has numerous wins accumulated over a number of years. Capable of well over 50 mph. I believe Andy is over 80 yrs old too.

Who says that people get "too damn old" to do stuff?

WC
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02-24-2016, 01:35 PM
Post: #20
RE: Commercial Fishing
I know of him, saw him on TV a few years ago. He and dad are the same age and came from very similar backgrounds, both vets etc.
I can't remember which fishing paper it was but they interviewed dad for his view in the changes in the industry from a dealers point of view and one on Andy for his point of view as a lobsterman. It was interesting to read.
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