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Wild Game Hunting
02-18-2016, 12:03 PM (This post was last modified: 02-25-2016 12:25 PM by Maine Democrat.)
Post: #1
Wild Game Hunting
There is an interesting chart here that compares beef with some of the more available wild game. Protein and fat numbers are listed. In our household we never buy any meat and eat home raised or hunted animals exclusively. Our family has been fortunate to have taken four moose over the past 10 years or so to supplement the annual whitetail deer and turkey harvest. I just had a plate of moose burger and it inspired this post. Hopefully others can add information on widgame harvest, pictures, etc.

http://bowhunting.net/artman/publish/article_1002.shtml
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02-18-2016, 12:19 PM
Post: #2
RE: Wild Game
The only game we get is free range lobster and crabs, which I usually trade since I do not eat them.
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02-19-2016, 06:15 PM
Post: #3
RE: Wild Game
(02-18-2016 12:19 PM)Islander Wrote:  The only game we get is free range lobster and crabs, which I usually trade since I do not eat them.

Free range is so much better than those cooped up in crates. You can taste the kelp in them. Lobsters from a pound taste muddy.
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02-19-2016, 06:44 PM
Post: #4
RE: Wild Game
When I worked for the amalgamated meat cutters union at Lipmans in Augusta in the early 70's, I cut up so many chickens that I don't believe that I wanted to eat one for quite sometime, I did on occasion but never went to Colonel Sanders to get a bucket.
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02-23-2016, 11:25 AM
Post: #5
RE: Wild Game
I used to cut up all my deer back before they started the expanded archery season. With expanded archery, you can hunt for several deer so I started hiring a butcher so I could keep on hunting for more. Now that my favorite expanded archery zones are drying up a bit, I started cutting my own game again. A friend built a cooler and I helped cut up two moose and a deer this year. With the cooler I can still go hunting while the meat is aging.

The wild turkeys I just breast them out and brine them before cooking or freezing. Brining the turkey makes it tender and juicy.

http://www.seriouseats.com/2014/11/quick...iving.html
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02-23-2016, 11:44 AM
Post: #6
RE: Wild Game
Quick question, is it legal to hunt deer this time of year, wife saw to hanging in a tree up the road, it was news to me.
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02-23-2016, 12:41 PM
Post: #7
RE: Wild Game
(02-23-2016 11:44 AM)Islander Wrote:  Quick question, is it legal to hunt deer this time of year, wife saw to hanging in a tree up the road, it was news to me.

No, all deer hunting ended in the middle of December and doesn't start until around the first of September. It could be a road kill legally tagged, a poached animal or one left hanging was too long. I'd report it to make sure it is legal.
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02-23-2016, 03:34 PM
Post: #8
RE: Wild Game
Well they are hanging in plain sight, so I would think that by now the sheriff's, marine patrol, etc have all driven by since it is on a main road into town.
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02-25-2016, 02:32 PM (This post was last modified: 02-25-2016 07:12 PM by Maine Democrat.)
Post: #9
RE: Wild Game Hunting
I have bow-hunted elk in the Rockies a number of times. The scenery is so spectacular that is easy to get distracted. Everywhere you look; it’s like a post card. My in-laws have a camp in north-western Wyoming near Yellowstone Park. Years ago, when my wife to-be and I went out there for my first visit, I was awe struck as to the numbers of animals I saw. I told her, “You should have never brought me out here”. The next year a September bow hunting trip was in the works.

My new Father in-law and I arrived a week early than my hunting buddy. We had all agreed to not drink until after we took an elk. I did some hunting and scouting for the first week. Towards the end of the first week, I walked up on a bedded herd of elk in a drainage below Bird Mountain in the Beartooths. They took off, but I was able to call three nice bulls back by using a cow call. They would not come close enough for a bow shot. There are a fair amount of grizzly bear in this area and there are “Do and Don’t” warning signs displayed in many places. We never gave it much thought because no one had seen a grizzly. I had found many bear trails beaten to the dirt with visible bear tracks and lots of bear scat. Back then, you could not carry a sidearm for personal protection while bow hunting.

The weather was ranging from the teens in the morning to the 70’s in the afternoon at this elevation. It’s hard to dress properly and you must wear a pack to carry everything you might need. There are few roads, you must keep your vehicle on them and no off-road vehicles are allowed. You go on horseback or as we had to, on foot. The day after my hunting buddy arrived we went to hunt the area where I had found the elk a few days earlier. We separated at Fantan Lake to hunt three different, but adjacent areas. We had agreed to check our radios every hour on the hour to see if help was needed. I found fresh elk and bear sign almost immediately and before noon nearly had a shot on a young bull. I spotted my hunting buddy and met up with him to make a plan and have lunch. While we were setting there eating lunch in the woods, I heard a low vibrating rumble like running animals. It stopped and we couldn’t imagine what it was. With the wind right to sneak up on the area where I had found the elk before, I decided to head into the wind across a meadow and up over a ridge to the drainage where the elk had been. Because his knees were bothering, my hunting buddy decided to head across the wind and slope.

I crossed the meadow and climbed up on the ridge. There was so much bear sign it is hard to describe. Beaten trails and lots of scat were everywhere. I picked up a 2 inch diameter piece of scat that was completely dried and stuck it in a pocket to impress the women back at the camp. Because of all the bear sign, I decided then to get off that ridge and headed back to the meadow I had just crossed. As I neared the meadow, I could see movement. “Elk” I thought and slipped up slowly to the wood edge for a possible shot. As I moved a pine limb to look, I saw three excited silver-back grizzly bears bounding towards me. The bears were a big sow and a pair of two year old cubs that were nearly as big as their Mom. At eye level, they looked like 800 to 900 pounds to me. They would stop, sniff the ground and then run some more. They had not seen me and my first impulse was to freeze and let them run past, but I felt the wind on the back of my neck and realized that they were coming for me. I kept my eye on the bears and backed slowly into the woods to find a tree to climb. Some trees were too small, some had limbs too high, but I found one and hung my bow up on a dead branch. One last look at the bears and I jumped up into the tree and started climbing.

The noise must have alerted them as they immediately sprinted to my tree. I don’t remember climbing, but I soon found myself at the top of the pine tree among the pine cones. The bears looked up at me and their eyes seemed dark and beady. Over the next two and half hours they would walk away and then return in about 15 minutes intervals to see if I had gotten down. Radio reception was terrible in the broken terrain, but I managed to make radio contact with my Father in-law and asked him to find my hunting buddy and come drive these bears off. Radio contact was intermittent and I mistakenly directed them to the wrong drainage. They couldn’t find or contact me on the radio. It was getting late and I didn’t want to spend the night in the tree so I planned the shortest route back to the truck. I climbed down to the lower limbs, looked around and swung down to the ground. I didn’t run, but walked very fast dead on a compass bearing the two or so miles back to truck. Crossing open areas with no trees made me feel somewhat vulnerable, but I made it.

Realizing that I had sent my rescue party up-wind of my location, I worried that they had drawn the bears off me and they were now in danger. I climbed up on a high rocky peak and attempted to make radio contact. The only word they heard was “truck” and then my hunting buddy said a word that rhymed with truck. They had some difficulty, but found their way back before dark. We were each a little stressed out over it all and on the way backed to camp; I suggested that we rescind the no drinking pack. There was no argument. Back at camp, I remembered the scat in my pocket, and pulled out nothing but crumbs to show everyone. My hunting buddy still likes to tell everyone that the bears had singled out the weak and came after me. I know now that the rumble I felt was the bears running up on us as we ate. It was good for my hunting buddy to walk cross wind and loose the bears as he had bad knees and can’t climb trees like I can.

The next day I went to the nearest Ranger station at Clay Butte to report the encounter. The lady Ranger said I had been very lucky to have survived that situation. She also told me that they had recently found a boot with a chewed off foot in it nearby. She advised that we hunt elsewhere. After getting back to Maine, my Father in-law’s brother sent a newspaper clipping of the story about the foot in the boot. The story said that it belonged to one of 17 missing persons in the area and that were working on an ID. I also learned that problem bears had been relocated from Yellowstone Park to the area where we have been hunting. I have been back five times since and plan another hunt this year. I have seen grizzly each time, but not so close.
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02-26-2016, 09:28 AM
Post: #10
RE: Wild Game Hunting
I would say that you were indeed a very very lucky man to survive that encounter!

My dad spent 2 1/2 yrs in Alaska and I have a couple friends who have spent a bit of time there. All say the favored weapon of those who have to travel in bear country is a 12 ga shotgun with 3 and 1/2 inch magnum shells.....and the fond hope that you never end up in a position where you might have to use it, as it is NO guarantee at all.

Remember Timothy Treadwell?:

......."The remains of Tim Treadwell, 46, a self proclaimed eco-warrior and photographer, along with girlfriend Amie Huguenard, 37, a physicians assistant, both of Malibu, California, were found Monday October 6, 2003, in Katmai usgs topo map of kaflia bay, alaska, area of maulingNational Park and Preserve on the Alaska Peninsula after the air taxi pilot Willy Fulton, who had flown in to pick the couple up near Kaflia Bay, contacted the National Park Service and Alaska State Troopers to report that a brown bear was sitting on top of what appeared to be human remains near the camp".........

The rest of the story is here

If I remember right the warden and pilot who flew in to this death scene by float plane, encountered the bear and killed it....using a significant number of shots to do so.

John McPhee wrote an excellent book about Alaska in 1991. One of the things he and a couple of others did was to hike north through the Brooks range in summer, and of course this is ALL bear country. They carried the prescribed weapon on their journey while praying that they did NOT encounter a grizzly. They saw some but the bears minded their own business, thankfully.

I would recommend McPhees book as it is a delightful read about rural Alaska. It is here:

Coming Into The Country

WC
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